skepticalavenger:

via EMILY’s List


mskamalakhan:

sallysbutter:

birth control pills: 

  • can treat cysts, endometriosis, pcos, and other potentially life-threatening conditions
  • can lessen severe symptoms of menstruation
  • can treat hormonal imbalances that result in severe acne and other side effects
  • can prevent pregnancy from ever occurring

erectile dysfunction drugs:

  • give you an erection



It's not just Hobby Lobby: These 71 companies don't want to cover your birth control either

(Source: saywhat-politics)



http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2014/06/hobby-lobby-wasnt-about-religious-freedom-it-was-about-abortion

blissandzen:

Kinda reminds you of Bush v. Gore, doesn’t it? Alito takes pains to make it clear that his opinion shouldn’t be considered precedent for anything except the narrowly specific issue at hand: whether contraceptives that some people consider abortifacients can be excluded from health plans.

I think it’s important to recognize what Alito is saying here. Basically, he’s making the case that abortion is unique as a religious issue. If you object to anything else on a religious basis, you’re probably out of luck. But if you object to abortion on religious grounds, you will be given every possible consideration. Even if your objection is only related to abortion in the most tenuous imaginable way—as it is here, where IUDs are considered to be abortifacients for highly idiosyncratic doctrinal reasons—it will be treated with the utmost deference.

This is not a ruling that upholds religious liberty. It is a ruling that specifically enshrines opposition to abortion as the most important religious liberty in America.
~Kevin Drum



(Source: teabonics-fb)



ppaction:

This is about our health and our lives. This is about our fundamental right to have control over our own bodies. This is about justice — and we’re fighting back. If you agree, join Justice Ginsburg’s dissent.

ppaction:

This is about our health and our lives. This is about our fundamental right to have control over our own bodies. This is about justice — and we’re fighting back. If you agree, join Justice Ginsburg’s dissent.



liberalsarecool:

National Coalition of American Nuns agrees with Obamacare and wants your boss out of your health care decisions.

liberalsarecool:

National Coalition of American Nuns agrees with Obamacare and wants your boss out of your health care decisions.



lesbianwicce:

during the witch burning times, midwives were targeted because they were healers and they eased the pain of childbirth which was meant to be woman’s punishment for eating the apple in the garden of eden.

birth control and abortion were considered sinful for the same reason.

anti-choice sentiment started because people (men) wanted women to be punished, and these misogynistic ideas have carried on for hundreds of years.

what a sad reflection on our society.



the-treble:

Are you shitting me? You’d think if you’re so smart and great, you wouldn’t spread such stupid bullshit. Her testimony wasn’t about her own personal hardships affording the birth control, but about other’s not being able to, and how her friend had PCOS and required hormonal treatment. Even if she had talked about herself, that testimony was two years ago.
I know you enjoy defending Rush Limbaugh and other raging homophobes, racists, and sexists, but could you cut down on the rest of this blatant fuckery?
Here’s her testimony, since you obviously didn’t read it/hear it. Congratulations on being right up there with Rush Limbaugh on missing the point.
What’s the phrase you like to use? Stay classy?

the-treble:

Are you shitting me? You’d think if you’re so smart and great, you wouldn’t spread such stupid bullshit. Her testimony wasn’t about her own personal hardships affording the birth control, but about other’s not being able to, and how her friend had PCOS and required hormonal treatment. Even if she had talked about herself, that testimony was two years ago.

I know you enjoy defending Rush Limbaugh and other raging homophobes, racists, and sexists, but could you cut down on the rest of this blatant fuckery?

Here’s her testimony, since you obviously didn’t read it/hear it. Congratulations on being right up there with Rush Limbaugh on missing the point.

What’s the phrase you like to use? Stay classy?

(Source: ronpaulproblems)



(Source: feministnews)



If employees’ health plans have to adhere to company owners’ religious beliefs, what happens if your boss doesn’t believe in vaccinations? Or as Guardian columnist Jill Filipovic tweeted, “What if your blood transfusions violate your employer’s religious beliefs? No surgery coverage?” Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America said in a statement, “Allowing this intrusion into personal decisions by their bosses opens a door that won’t easily be shut.”

Judy Waxman, vice president of health and reproductive rights at the National Women’s Law Center, says these scenarios are real possibilities. “What if an employer believes women should be subservient and doesn’t believe in providing the same wage and hours for them as male employees?” She relayed one case where a private school denied health insurance to married women, because school management believed husbands are the “head of the household” and should provide for their wives.


But really, how hard is it to use contraception?
Anti-choicers who advocate for, vote for, and applaud the closing of clinics that help make contraception infinitely more accessible and affordable than it is


Does my weight affect what emergency contraception I can use?

plannedparenthood:

image

A lot of you asked us:

Is it true that Plan B isn’t effective for women who weigh 176 pounds, and it becomes less effective at 165? What other emergency contraception options are there?

We’re working to make sure that everyone has all of the information they need in order to decide what’s best for them when it comes to emergency contraception. Let’s break down the facts:

What’s emergency contraception (EC)?

Emergency contraception (also called the morning-after pill) is birth control that you can use up to 5 days after unprotected sex (like if you don’t use a condom or forget to take your pills, for example).

There are a few different kinds of emergency contraception:

  • There are two different types of EC pills:
  • Ulipristal acetate, known by the brand name ella
  • You need a prescription from a nurse or doctor to get ella
  • Levonorgestrel pills, including the brands Next Choice One Dose, My Way, and Plan B One-Step
  • Plan B One-Step is available at drugstores over the counter, without a prescription for anyone, regardless of gender or age.
  • The sooner levonorgestrel pills are taken after unprotected sex, the better they work.

Why is Plan B One-Step in the news?

It was recently announced that in Europe, a method of emergency contraception which is identical to Plan B One-Step pills is now going to include information on the label stating that these pills are less effective in women over 165 pounds and may not be effective in women over 175 pounds. This label change was based on analysis of a 2011 study.

I weigh more than 175 pounds. What are my options for EC?

The most effective option for women of any weight is getting a ParaGard IUD inserted by a nurse or doctor. If you’d rather take a pill, you can take ella. Weight can also be a factor for ella effectiveness: If you have a body mass index (BMI) that’s higher than 35, it’s less effective (but still worth a shot if you can’t get an IUD). Click here to learn more about ella.

If the IUD or ella aren’t options for you and you weigh more than 175 pounds, it’s perfectly safe to take Plan B One-Step or Next Choice One Dose—but it may not work for you.

How do I get ella?

You need a prescription from a nurse or doctor to get ella. You can also consult with a doctor through the ella website and get it delivered to you the next day. (You need to have a credit card and be 18 to order it online.)

When it comes to weight and effectiveness of emergency contraception, more study is needed but, until then, if you weigh more than 165 and need EC, ella and the ParaGard IUD are your best bet. If you need EC and have questions about which EC method is best for you, contact your local Planned Parenthood health center.

-Chelsea at Planned Parenthood



femininebutfeminist:

I’ve been thinking a lot about how strange it feels when a man wants to have unprotected sex, asking me at the very last second, “You’re not on birth control?!”

It really offends me when men act surprised that I’m not doing the whole pill/shot/IUD thing,

Oh i’m sorry, apparently I have to pump my body full of hormones so you can pump your load all over my insides. I have to mess up my natural chemical balance so that you can possibly give me whatever fucking germ the last person you slept with had? Or the one before that. I don’t want to know.

I think it’s really unfair that men grow up never having to worry about carrying a life inside of them. Never feeling that terror if their period starts a week late. Never having to decide which is better, implanting a piece of metal inside your reproductive organs, getting jabbed with or taking a daily pill of synthesized hormones that could potentially increase your chance of a myriad of uncomfortable and life threatening side effects.

And when a man simply implies he’s expecting you to be on birth control, that’s just the icing on the cake.